Endowed Chairs

John A. Glaspy, MD, MPH

Simms/Mann Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Integrative Oncology at UCLA

John Glaspy, MD, MPH holds the Simms/Mann Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Integrative Oncology at UCLA and is the Medical Director of the Simms/Mann-UCLA Center for Integrative Oncology. Dr. Glaspy is professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Glaspy serves as co-chair to the division with Dr. Dennis Slamon. He is director of the JCCC Clinical Research Unit and director of the JCCC Women’s Cancer Research Program. He is a researcher and oncologist with a national reputation in clinical medicine as an acute diagnostician and outstanding clinician.

Dr. Glaspy is professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Glaspy serves as co-chair to the division with Dr. Dennis Slamon. He is director of the JCCC Clinical Research Unit and director of the JCCC Women’s Cancer Research Program. He is a researcher and oncologist with a national reputation in clinical medicine as an acute diagnostician and outstanding clinician.

Dr. Glaspy is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Southwest Oncology Group, American Federation for Clinical Research, International Society of Interferon Research, and American Society of Nuclear Medicine, among others. He is also a fellow of the American College of Physicians. During the course of his career, Dr. Glaspy has authored more than 270 articles, abstracts, and book chapters. He has received numerous awards and honors, including being named one of the “Best Doctors in America.”

Currently, Dr. Glaspy is involved in basic research in tumor immunology and the effects of fatty acids on carcinogenesis. His clinical interests also include chemotherapy-induced anemia, the role of hematopoietic growth factors in cancer management, and new approaches to the treatment of breast cancer and malignant melanoma. Dr. Glaspy received his MD from the UCLA School of Medicine and his MPH in health services administration from the UCLA School of Public Health. He completed his residency in internal medicine and his fellowship in hematology and oncology at the UCLA School of Medicine.

Dr. Glaspy understands the value of providing integrative care to patients with cancer and has been a strong advocate for these services. He is devoted to providing the leadership from the Department of Medicine on the Founders Board because of his strong belief in the mission of the Simms/Mann Center. He considers the Simms/Mann Center to be an essential part of comprehensive oncology care.

https://www.simmsmanncenter.ucla.edu/

 

Margo B. Minissian, PhD, ACNP

Simms/Mann Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Nurse Education, Innovation, and Research at Cedars-Sinai

Margo B. Minissian, PhD, ACNP is the Margo B. Minissian, PhD, ACNP is the Simms/Mann Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Nurse Education, Innovation, and Research at Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Minissian is the Executive Director of the Brawerman Nursing Institute and oversees education, research and performance improvement. She is Assistant Professor of Cardiology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. She completed a biological research PhD at the UCLA School of Nursing, was the UCLA Dean’s Scholar Fellow and Regents Scholar. Her research focuses on cardiovascular prevention with an emphasis on young women who experience severe preterm delivery and preeclampsia. Her work has earned numerous awards and funding from the National of Institutes of Health.

As a researcher who examines ways to prevent disease, Minissian has a strong interest in protecting healthcare workers during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. Her team of co-investigators enrolled registered nurses in a study that seeks to measure and quantify inflammatory proteins which signal prior to a healthy person becoming sick. “By evaluating these proteins immediately before shift work, we might be able to reduce the risk nurses face when caring for COVID-19 patients”. Minissian adds, “The ultimate goal is to develop a point of care screening test to help healthcare workers stay healthy while caring for our critically ill on the front-lines”.

http://www.cedars-sinai.org/newsroom/simmsmann-family-foundation-establishes-chair-at-cedars-sinai/

Pat Levitt, PhD

Simms/Mann Chair in Developmental Neurogenetics at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Chief Scientific Officer of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and the WM Keck Provost Professor of Neurogenetics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California

Dr. Levitt is the Simms/Mann Chair in Developmental Neurogenetics at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Chief Scientific Officer of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and the WM Keck Provost Professor of Neurogenetics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. Dr. Levitt is also the Chief Scientific Officer of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Dr. Levitt has held chair and institute directorships at the University of Southern California, Vanderbilt University and the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Levitt has been a MERIT awardee from the National Institute of Mental Health and served as a member of the National Advisory Mental Health Council for the National Institute of Mental Health. He is an elected member of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, an Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Dr. Levitt is a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University, and serves as Scientific Director of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, a policy council that brings the best research from child development and neuroscience to assist state and federal policy makers and private sector business leaders in making wise decisions regarding program investment. He has spoken on this topic in over 30 states.

Dr. Levitt’s research focuses on the development of circuitry that controls learning, emotional and social behavior. The laboratory performs studies on genetic and environment factors that influence circuit formation and the underlying influence of individual differences (heterogeneity) in complex behaviors. Studies also identify factors that increase risk for neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. His clinical research addresses disorder heterogeneity by studying children with neurodevelopmental disorders who also have co-occurring medical conditions, and children exposed to toxic stress (neglect, abuse) early in life that may impact mental and physical health short- and long-term. The studies have a goal of developing better diagnostic criteria and personalized treatments. He has published over 265 scientific papers.

Ruth Feldman, PhD

Simms/Mann Professor of Developmental Social Neuroscience and Director of the Center for Developmental, Social, and Relationship Neuroscience at the Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya

Ruth Feldman, PhD, is the Simms-Mann professor of developmental social neuroscience and director of the Center for Developmental, Social, and Relationship Neuroscience at the Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya with a joint appointment at Yale University Child Study Center.  She is also director of the Irving B. Harris community-based clinic and internship program for young children and their families.  Her research focuses on the biological basis of social affiliation, processes of biobehavioral synchrony, longitudinal follow-up of infants at high risk stemming from biological (e.g., prematurity), maternal (e.g., postpartum depression), and contextual (e.g., war-related trauma) risk conditions, the neuroscience of empathy, and the effects of touch-based interventions.  Her studies on the role of oxytocin in health and psychopathology have been instrumental for understanding the biological basis of social collaboration in humans.  Her research on the maternal and paternal brain, human bond formation, the long-term effects of Kangaroo-Care on premature infants, the brain basis of conflict resolution, and the effects of maternal postpartum depression on children’s brain and behavior received substantial empirical and media attention. Dr. Feldman is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, has been on the editorial board of several high-impact journals, and has published over 300 articles in scientific journals and book chapters.

For more information on The Feldman Lab and the Inaugural Conference of the Center for Developmental Social Neuroscience, please see the links below:

https://ruthfeldmanlab.com/

https://www.idc.ac.il/en/whatsup/pages/ruth-feldman-brain-and-mind.aspx

The Simms/Mann Institute seeks to identify and pursue strategies to promote the health and wellness of children ages 0-3 and their families.  Our annual Think Tank, Faculty Fellowship, and The First 36 Project, are all strategies aimed at bringing the most cutting-edge science of early childhood to professionals and practitioners.

We are excited to announce the launch of our newest strategy, CuddleBright Experience, which brings the science of early childhood directly to parents.

Science now tells us that secure relationships with parents and caregivers help children thrive—socially, emotionally, cognitively and physically. CuddleBright was designed to provide parents and caregivers with the knowledge and tools to strengthen the connection they share with their child, and the ability to navigate the ups and downs of the first three years—and beyond.

The Simms/Mann Institute is currently piloting CuddleBright as a tool to support parents and children in a variety of settings, including education and healthcare.

CuddleBright Cares

The Simms/Mann Institute proudly partners with qualified 501(c)(3) nonprofit hospitals, health centers, and community-based agencies to empower underserved families with young children.  By providing in-kind contributions of the CuddleBright toolkit, the Simms/Mann Institute offers a no-cost resource for community providers to amplify their existing parent-child programming.

Clinicians and other providers can weave the CuddleBright curriculum into their practice with families, to anchor dialogue about building healthy attachments between parents and children. By sharing CuddleBright with the families they serve, organizations can enhance programmatic offerings, foster supportive parenting, and increase positive early childhood development.  Some of our current partners are:

  • Alliance of Moms
  • Aviva Family and Children’s Services
  • Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA)
  • Children’s Insitute, Inc
  • Children Today
  • Claris Health
  • Community Action Commission of Santa Barbara County
  • El Nido Family Centers
  • Family Service Agency
  • Isla Vista Youth Projects
  • Partners for Children South LA
  • Queen’s University Belfast
  • Sacramento County Office of Education
  • Saint John’s Health Center, Providence Health & Services
  • San Diego Center for Children
  • The First 36 Project
  • Transition House
  • UCLA Ties for Families
  • University of California San Francisco (UCSF)
  • Vista Del Mar
  • Westside Infant Family Network (WIN)
  • Zero to Three

To learn more about the CuddleBright Experience please visit us at CuddleBright.com

Education Initiative Videos

The Simms/Mann Institute is dedicated to disseminating the latest child development theories and neuroscience research through many different communication channels, which includes creating video content that is educational, engaging and easy to share.

2015 Think Tank Videos

 

The Simms/Mann Institute Faculty Fellowship recognizes faculty in the field of 0-3 early childhood education whose professional experience, leadership ability, and interest in exploring and integrating research related to early childhood development will make significant contributions to the field and the broader community.

In California, the California Community Colleges and The California State University (CSU) educate the vast majority of the state’s early childhood professionals. With research indicating that two out of three American children under 5 receive some form of nonparental childcare—and that most often, this care begins within the first year of life—the vital need for a highly trained early care and education workforce has never been more clear. To meet the needs of 21st century families and workplaces, it is critical that students graduate ready to provide the highest quality care to children ages 0-3.

The Simms/Mann Institute Faculty Fellowship is designed specifically for California Community College and CSU faculty in the fields of child development, early childhood education, psychology, and related areas of nursing. The unique, yearlong Fellowship provides a select group of faculty access to:

  • World renowned researchers who present cutting-edge findings at the annual Simms/Mann Institute Think Tank;
  • A collaborative, interdisciplinary cohort of faculty interested in furthering their knowledge; and
  • Support in creating and completing a project related to new research in the early childhood field, to be used for classroom and community presentation.

As a result of this Fellowship, faculty who are chosen through a rigorous selection process are able to immediately incorporate leading-edge research into their classrooms, invigorate their teaching, and stimulate student interest in learning. As our faculty become leaders in their field, they equip students with the knowledge and experience to become leaders in the workforce.

The Simms/Mann Institute, in partnership with UCLA, offered a conference on Spirituality and Medicine. The first of its kind, our event brought together spiritual leaders, medical oncologists, social workers, and nurses to share knowledge, ideas, and treatment plans. The 2012 conference’s goal was to create a sense of community among forty-three people from disparate professional fields, using the theme When Cancer Strikes: Response Strategies for Pastoral Caregivers. Of the attendees, thirty were representatives from faiths and local congregations.

We believe there lies opportunity at the intersection of spirituality and medicine for medical and pastoral caregivers to have meaningful dialogue. The conference addressed a growing need emerging for professionals across disciplines. Leaders convened by the Institute knew that with an aging population it becomes more important for professionals to work together providing spiritual support, and that spirituality is a unique place to look for hope and structure. Particularly during times of medical crisis, we all search for meaning and purpose in life. The Institute encourages more collaboration and guidance.

Speaker Topics

  • A Physician’s Perspective
  • An Inter-Faith Chaplain’s Perspective
  • The Impact of Cancer
  • Unique Needs and Coping
  • Case presentation

Speakers and Topics

Michael Eselun

Michael Eselun, a Certified Associate Clinical Chaplain and Chaplain for the Simms/Mann – UCLA Center for Integrative Oncology, served as host and facilitated the discussion. He shared his experience in providing inter-faith spiritual care to oncology patients and families over the last nine years as well as several years working in palliative care and hospice.

Anne Coscarelli, Ph.D.

Dr. Coscarelli provided an overview of the unique challenges of a cancer diagnosis. She is Founding Director of the Simms/Mann – UCLA Center for Integrative Oncology, a psychologist, and has thirty-one years of experience working in the medical environment and with patients and families with cancer as well as conducting research in quality of life.

Kauser Ahmed, Ph.D.

Dr. Ahmed is a psychologist and training director at the Simms/Mann – UCLA Center for Integrative Oncology with over ten years of experience treating patients and families. She shared her expertise in working with patients and families affected by cancer and the integrative model we have developed.

Thomas J. Pier, LCSW

Tom Pier is an oncology social worker at the Simms/Mann – UCLA Center for Integrative Oncology with over fifteen years of experience treating patients and families with cancer. He shared his expertise in working with patients and families affected by cancer and his role in the integrative model developed at UCLA.

Herbert Eradat, MD

Dr. Eradat is a medical oncologist at UCLA and a childhood cancer survivor himself. He provided a physician’s perspective on cancer and the impact on patients, ideas about how pastoral care providers can be an effective part of the team, and engaged the participants in a dialogue about what they see once a patient leaves the doctor’s office.

The First 36 Project is a ground-breaking pilot program developed by the Simms/Mann Institute, in partnership with Builders of Jewish Education (BJE) and The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles. The First 36 Project was created to provide a select group of Parent & Me instructors with an exclusive professional development experience designed to amplify their ability to support parents as they build strong, meaningful bonds with their children.

As facilitators of Parent & Me and Transition classes, parent educators can have a powerful influence on how parents interact with their children. The better prepared parent educators are to work with parents, the more tools parents take away to support their children’s growth and development. The research-based information that parent educators can share with parents cuts through the often pseudo-scientific noise around parenting.

Parent educators become Fellows when they apply and are accepted to join The First 36 Project cohort. Together as a cohort and with guidance from an experienced content specialist, Maxine Mintzer, PhD, The First 36 Project Fellows learn and discuss a combination of child development theory and the latest neuroscience research to bolster their knowledge of the importance of secure attachment, understanding temperament, self-regulation, executive function, communication, and empathy, among other topics. Parent educators then bring this knowledge to the discussions they facilitate with parents, thus supporting parents as they build strong, meaningful bonds with their children.

The First 36 Project uses three strategies for accomplishing its goals:

  1. Delivering content based on early child development theory and neuroscience research to parent educators to amplify their ability to support parents as they build a healthy emotional connection with their children.
  2. Cultivating a cohort community of other parent educators to cross-pollinate ideas for applying what they learn with parents.
  3. Using professional coaching to help parent educators package the content in ways that parents of young children can understand and apply.

For more information about the First 36 Project please download our brochure HERE.

The First 36 Project Fellows: Cohort 4 (2019)

    • Shoshana Dubinsky – Toras Emes
    • Julie Dubron – Adat Ariel
    • Diane Germansky – Temple Akiba
    • Jamie Hoffer – Temple Isaiah
    • Rachel Klein – Pressman Academy
    • Bri Naiman – Leo Baeck Temple
    • Jennifer Pearlman – Wilshire Boulevard Temple
    • Claire Peikon – Maimonides Academy
    • Liron Rosenberg – Maimonides Academy
    • Sara Rosenthal – Emek Hebrew Academy
    • Susan Rudich – Wilshire Boulevard Temple
    • Alex Yedidsion – Sephardic Temple

The First 36 Project Fellows: Cohort 3 (2018)

  • Chana Blugrind, Yaldei Yisroel
  • Juliette Portnoy – Valley Beth Shalom
  • Chana Herzog – Gan Israel
  • Elana Banafsheha – Wise School
  • Genene Turndorf – Wise School
  • Kira Rappaport – Pressman Academy
  • Andrea Segall – Temple Aliyah
  • Edita Leifer – Temple Aliyah
  • Paula Hoffman – Ilan Ramon
  • Ailee Dembo – Valley Beth Shalom
  • Rachel Tuch – Lainer School
  • Jacqueline Lafer – Kehillat Israel
  • Youna Yaghoobzadeh – Lainer School

The First 36 Project Fellows: Cohort 2 (2017)

  • Emily Glickman, Leo Baeck Temple
  • Nicole Mevorak, Debbie Myman, and Jenna Pitson, Wise School
  • Shayna Goldman and Michal Rosenbaum, Yeshiva Aharon Yaakov Ohr Eliyahu
  • Cheryl Ibgui, Harkham Hilel Academy 
  • Alana Levitt, University Synagogue
  • Molly Mills, Wilshire Boulevard Temple
  • Jayne Rosen, Temple Israel of Hollywood 
  • Jessica Smiedt, Temple Isaiah
  • Valerie Segall, Valley Beth Shalom

The First 36 Project Fellows: Cohort 1 (2015-2016)

  • Sari Abrams and Miri Avraham, Pressman Academy Early Childhood Center of Temple Beth Am
  • Samantha Loveman and Sarah Manor, Sinai Temple Early Childhood Center
  • Shanti Greenspan and Sari Edber, Temple Beth Hillel Early Childhood Center
  • Lisa Whitman and Erin Aghai, Temple Judea Early Childhood Center
  • Susy Shapiro and Parastou Bassirat, Valley Beth Shalom Early Childhood Center
  • Dana Nicole Lerner, Wilshire Boulevard Temple Early Childhood Center

The First 36 Project Lectures

  • May 27, 2015: Dr. Ruth Feldman The Power of Early Connection: Moving Practice to Theory
  • November 15, 2015: Professor Sherry Turkle Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in the Digital Age 

Click Here to read a recent article about The First 36 Project:
Raising the bar for parent-and-me classes

The Simms/Mann Institute supports Hold On To Your Music Foundation and Mona Golabak’s theatrical production of The Pianist of Willesden Lane. Based on the best-selling book, The Children of Willesden Lane, The Pianist of Willesden Lane tells the story of Golabek’s mother, an Austrian refugee who escaped the Nazis aboard the Kindertransport to England. A musical prodigy, the teenage Lisa Jura went on to win a music scholarship to the London Royal Academy during World War II and became an inspiration to all she met. The performances at Cortines High School in Los Angeles coincided with the seventy-sixth anniversary of Kristallnacht, the 1938 Nazi attacks on Jewish businesses and homes.

In 2014, the Institute supported production of the documentary “I am a Pianist.” The sixty-minute feature documentary is being produced in collaboration with KLCS/PBS. The documentary follows concert pianist Mona Golabek across America as she brings her mother and grandmother’s story to students and communities in various areas including Alabama, California, Ohio, and Illinois. This film chronicles Mona’s journey to bring her mother’s story to schoolchildren across America—from Birmingham, Alabama to her hometown of Los Angeles—glimpsing Mona onstage, in classrooms, at the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, and bringing messages of perseverance and understanding to enthusiastic young audiences, ultimately creating a legacy that resonates in the lives and music of multiple generations today. “I am a Pianist” will bring a unique look to the lessons of the Holocaust to students and audiences of the 21st century.

2019 SIMMS/MANN INSTITUTE THINK TANK

The Simms/Mann Institute Think Tank is an annual convening of leading neuroscientists from around the world who present to, and engage with, a select group of 500 stakeholders who can directly impact policy and practice in early child development. 

For our 2019 Think Tank, we took an interdisciplinary approach and brought together a range of researchers to showcase cutting-edge science related to children ages 0-3. 

The 2019 Think Tank Theme, “Rituals, Routines & Body Rhythms: The Simple and Profound Impacts of When We Eat, Sleep, and Play for Health Across the Lifespan” emphasized the importance of the circadian rhythm in everyday routines.

The Think Tank was also an opportunity to recognize and celebrate the outstanding contributions of leaders in the field of 0-3 through the Whole Child Awards which we presented to three leaders in community leadership, medicine and education.

2019 SPEAKERS & PRESENTATION TOPICS
(click on the topic to see a video of the presentation)
2019 WHOLE CHILD AWARD WINNERS

The Simms/Mann Institute is proud to announce the 2019 Whole Child Awards to honor leaders who pursue a whole child approach in their work. This year, the Simms/Mann Institute expanded the Whole Child Award to honor extraordinary individuals from a variety of sectors.  Specifically, we looked for individuals who made a significant impact in the zero to three space as medical clinicians (OB/GYNs, pediatricians, or nurses), nonprofit/community leaders, or educational champions

Our 2019 Whole Child Award Winners are:

VISIONARY
Samuel Meisels, EdD, Expert on early childhood assessment and child development and Founding Executive Director of the Buffett Early Childhood Institute at the University of Nebraska.

MEDICINE  
David Schonfeld, MD, Developmental-behavioral Pediatrician in General Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and Director of the National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement (NCSCB). He holds a joint appointment at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

COMMUNITY
Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, PhD, Stanley and Debra Lefkowitz Faculty Fellow in Psychology at Temple University and is a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution.  Director of Temple University’s Infant Language Laboratory.

Click to see the Whole Child Award Panel Discussion

SIMMS/MANN INSTITUTE THINK TANK

The Simms/Mann Institute Think Tank is an annual convening of leading neuroscientists from around the world who present to—and engage with—a select group of 500 stakeholders who can directly impact policy and practice in early child development. Researchers showcase cutting-edge science related to children ages 0-3 for leaders from fields including education, medicine, business and philanthropy, who can immediately incorporate the research in their work with children, families and communities.

The Think Tank is also a big stage to recognize and celebrate the outstanding contributions of leaders in the field of 0-3. At the Think Tank, the Institute presents Whole Child Awards to leaders in community leadership, medicine and education; as well as honors Simms/Mann Institute Fellows.

2018 SPEAKERS

• Marc Brackett, PhD, Center for Emotional Intelligence, Yale University
• Natasha Cabrera, PhD, Family Involvement Laboratory, Maryland Population Research Center
• Ruth Feldman, PhD, Interdisciplinary Center, Herliza, Israel Child Study Center, Yale University
• Phil Fisher, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Oregon
• Pat Levitt, PhD, Institute of the Developing Mind, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
• Sonia Lupien, PhD, Centre for Studies on Human Stress, University of Montreal
• Emeran Mayer, MD, Director, Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, UCLA
• Michael Meaney, PhD, Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health Researcher, Douglas Institute
• Arietta Slade, PhD, Child Study Center, Yale University

2018 WHOLE CHILD AWARD WINNERS

VISIONARYMatthew Melmed, MD, Executive Director, ZERO TO THREE
MEDICALTom Boyce, MD, Lisa and John Pritzker, Distinguished Professor of Developmental and Behavioral Health, UCSF
COMMUNITYPat Kuhl, PhD and Andrew Meltzoff, PhD, Co-directors of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, University of Washington

 

On November 3, 2015, the Simms/Mann Institute convened a group of 500 stakeholders from fields including education, business, philanthropy and medicine who directly impact policy and practice in early child development for its annual Think Tank. The Think Tank served as a platform to showcase cutting-edge neuroscience research related to children ages 0-3.

The eight international speakers armed the audience with the latest and greatest research in early child development. The speakers covered topics ranging from the importance of early childhood investments, to attachment, to temperament and executive functions, for example.

The Think Tank showcased the vital role the California Community Colleges and The California State University play in training our state’s early care and education workforce. Thirteen faculty from California Community Colleges and The California State University were awarded Simms/Mann Institute Faculty Fellowship, and will spend the year designing and implementing projects to translate and disseminate research presented at the Think Tank. Please click here to learn about past Simms/Mann Institute Faculty Fellow’s projects.

The Think Tank also celebrated outstanding contributions to the field of 0-3. Specifically, the Institute presented a $25,000 Simms/Mann Whole Child Award to a leader in the field of medicine who pursues a whole child approach in caring for children and their families. The inaugural award was presented to Dr. Michael Yogman, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Chairman of the Board at the Boston Children’s Museum.

The Think Tank was intended to inform and inspire the audience. Our hope is that together we can develop innovative solutions in looking at the whole child, families, and communities.

Speaker Topics:

Importance of Early Investment: Art Rolnick

Why Early Matters, Impact of Toxic Stress on Brain Architecture: Dr. Pat Levitt

Attachment and Regulation: Dr. Ruth Feldman

Temperament and Genetics: Dr. Nathan Fox

Dyadic Intervention: Dr. Alicia Lieberman

Executive Functions: Dr. Adele Diamond

Mentalization: Dr. Peter Fonagy

The Simms/Mann Think Tank brings together cutting-edge early childhood learning and brain science researchers, college faculty, and thought-leaders to explore, understand, and disseminate the latest thinking in the areas of infant/toddler development, early childhood education, and the training for those working with children ages 0-3.

The Simms/Mann Institute held the first annual Simms/Mann Think Tank in 2013.

  • Featured keynote speakers Drs. Patricia Kuhl and Andrew Meltzoff, internationally recognized researchers from the University of Washington
  • Introduced the 2013-2014 Fellows
  • Included professional guests from the community – pediatricians, nurses, researchers, psychiatrists, and Community College officials
  • Location: Santa Barbara, CA

The Simms/Mann Think Tank brings together cutting-edge early childhood learning and brain science researchers, college faculty, and thought-leaders to explore, understand, and disseminate the latest thinking in the areas of infant/toddler development, early childhood education, and the training for those working with children ages 0-3.

  • Featured keynote speakers Dr. Ruth Feldman from Bar-Ilan University and Yale University Child Study Center and Dr. Kyle Pruett from Yale University Child Study Center
  • 2013-2014 Fellows presented their projects
  • 2014-2015 Fellows were introduced
  • Included professional guests from the community – pediatricians, researchers, psychiatrists, foundations, and Community College officials
  • Location: Santa Barbara, CA