Endowed Chairs

Education
Foundation

Pat Levitt, PhD

Simms/Mann Chair in Developmental Neurogenetics at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Chief Scientific Officer of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and the WM Keck Provost Professor of Neurogenetics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California

Dr. Levitt is the Simms/Mann Chair in Developmental Neurogenetics at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Chief Scientific Officer of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and the WM Keck Provost Professor of Neurogenetics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. Dr. Levitt is also the Chief Scientific Officer of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Dr. Levitt has held chair and institute directorships at the University of Southern California, Vanderbilt University and the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Levitt has been a MERIT awardee from the National Institute of Mental Health and served as a member of the National Advisory Mental Health Council for the National Institute of Mental Health. He is an elected member of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, an Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Dr. Levitt is a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University, and serves as Scientific Director of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, a policy council that brings the best research from child development and neuroscience to assist state and federal policy makers and private sector business leaders in making wise decisions regarding program investment. He has spoken on this topic in over 30 states.

Dr. Levitt’s research focuses on the development of circuitry that controls learning, emotional and social behavior. The laboratory performs studies on genetic and environment factors that influence circuit formation and the underlying influence of individual differences (heterogeneity) in complex behaviors. Studies also identify factors that increase risk for neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. His clinical research addresses disorder heterogeneity by studying children with neurodevelopmental disorders who also have co-occurring medical conditions, and children exposed to toxic stress (neglect, abuse) early in life that may impact mental and physical health short- and long-term. The studies have a goal of developing better diagnostic criteria and personalized treatments. He has published over 265 scientific papers.

Ruth Feldman, PhD

Simms/Mann Professor of Developmental Social Neuroscience and Director of the Center for Developmental, Social, and Relationship Neuroscience at the Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya

Ruth Feldman, PhD, is the Simms-Mann professor of developmental social neuroscience and director of the Center for Developmental, Social, and Relationship Neuroscience at the Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya with a joint appointment at Yale University Child Study Center.  She is also director of the Irving B. Harris community-based clinic and internship program for young children and their families.  Her research focuses on the biological basis of social affiliation, processes of biobehavioral synchrony, longitudinal follow-up of infants at high risk stemming from biological (e.g., prematurity), maternal (e.g., postpartum depression), and contextual (e.g., war-related trauma) risk conditions, the neuroscience of empathy, and the effects of touch-based interventions.  Her studies on the role of oxytocin in health and psychopathology have been instrumental for understanding the biological basis of social collaboration in humans.  Her research on the maternal and paternal brain, human bond formation, the long-term effects of Kangaroo-Care on premature infants, the brain basis of conflict resolution, and the effects of maternal postpartum depression on children’s brain and behavior received substantial empirical and media attention. Dr. Feldman is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, has been on the editorial board of several high-impact journals, and has published over 300 articles in scientific journals and book chapters.

For more information on The Feldman Lab and the Inaugural Conference of the Center for Developmental Social Neuroscience, please see the links below:

https://ruthfeldmanlab.com/

https://www.idc.ac.il/en/whatsup/pages/ruth-feldman-brain-and-mind.aspx

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Other Education Projects

Foundation

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

The Simms Mann Family Foundation supports The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University as they catalyze local, national, and international innovation in policy and practice focused on children and families. They design, test, and implement these ideas in collaboration with a broad network of research, practice, policy, community, and philanthropic leaders.

Foundation

Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence

The Simms Mann Family Foundation has long supported cancer research at Yale. We are excited to now also support the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence in its collaboration with the Willows Community School to deliver the Yale for Emotional Intelligence’s RULER program, an evidence-based pre-k through 12th grade approach to social and emotional learning to Southern California Schools.

Institute

2018 Simms/Mann Institute Think Tank

The Think Tank brings together cutting-edge early childhood learning, college faculty, and thought-leaders to explore and disseminate the latest thinking in the areas of infant/toddler development, early childhood education, and the training for those working with children ages 0-3.

Institute

CuddleBright Experience

The CuddleBright Experience brings the science of early childhood directly to parents and caregivers, providing them with knowledge and tools to strengthen their bond with their child and help navigate the ups and downs of the first three years—and beyond.

Institute

Education Initiative Videos

The Simms/Mann Institute is dedicated to disseminating the latest child development theories and neuroscience research through many different communication channels, which includes creating video content that is educational, engaging and easy to share.

Institute

Simms/Mann Faculty Fellows

The Simms/Mann Institute Faculty Fellowship recognizes faculty in the field of 0-3 early childhood education whose professional experience, leadership ability, and interest in exploring and integrating research related to early childhood development will make significant contributions to the field and the broader community.

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